Occupancy Sensors Reduce Commercial Light Fixture Energy Consumption

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occupancy sensor Occupancy Sensors Reduce Commercial Light Fixture Energy ConsumptionEvery private office has an occupancy sensor in our newly built out Thinkspace office.  Our goal is to reduce energy consumption by more than 30% for the space that we occupy.  We installed commercial light fixtures with higher performance ballast and lamps.  That alone should help us get to the 30% energy savings.  In addition to energy efficient commercial light fixtures, we installed occupancy sensors.

There have been a number of times when I have been driving by the building at night and have seen lights on.  Sometimes people accidently leave the lights on in private offices and sometimes the cleaning crew forgets to turn off the lights.  This happens in the evenings during the week day and even over weekends.  With the installation of the occupancy sensor, we can ensure that lights are turned off if people are not working inside the space.

According to the EPA, occupancy sensors can reduce a room’s electricity consumption up to 90%.  Based on a study, here’s the estimated energy savings based on room type:

 

Occupancy area

Energy Savings

Private office

13-50%

Classroom

40-46%

Conference room

22-65%

Restrooms

30-90%

Corridors

30-80%

Storage areas

45-80%

 

The other item that we also installed was the VendingMiser on our vending machine.  The VendingMiser powers down the lights and compressor of the vending machine if there are no people around in our kitchen area.  It still keeps the items inside cool but it dramatically reduces the amount of energy consumed by an average of 46%.  This saves about $150 per vending machine on an annual basis as each vending machine consumes approximately 7-14 kWh per day.  It feels great to be reducing our energy consumption as well as creating a more energy efficient space.  These types of energy reducing methods also count toward our LEED certification.

11 replies
  1. Peter Chee
    Peter Chee says:

    Thanks. We still have six thousand SF under contruction. There are still subcontractors using power tools in the space. We will collect usage data after the work is complete and then be able to see how much more efficient our space is.

    Reply
  2. Peter Chee
    Peter Chee says:

    Thanks. We still have six thousand SF under contruction. There are still subcontractors using power tools in the space. We will collect usage data after the work is complete and then be able to see how much more efficient our space is.

    Reply
  3. Chris
    Chris says:

    Peter – I work for a Leviton distributor, and we always recommend the occupancy sensors to customers who want to cut down on bills. The office application is huge. But people at home also forget to turn off lights in bedrooms, rec rooms, and laundry rooms. It’s a preventable waste that people just forget to think about, so I’m really glad there’s an easy solution these days.

    Reply
  4. Chris
    Chris says:

    Peter – I work for a Leviton distributor, and we always recommend the occupancy sensors to customers who want to cut down on bills. The office application is huge. But people at home also forget to turn off lights in bedrooms, rec rooms, and laundry rooms. It’s a preventable waste that people just forget to think about, so I’m really glad there’s an easy solution these days.

    Reply
  5. Jafriend
    Jafriend says:

    Again, the thought is good but the people's needs are ignored. It has been a pain trying to convense these things that I am in the office. I hate them. But I dont hate the idea. How about something like, they stay on for 4 hours between 8 and 5. They can go to 1 hr for a few hours before and after. At night they can be set to 20 minutes. If there is usually no one in the building over the weekend then they can go off after 20 minutes.

    I can go on and on about how I hate looking into a room to see if something is there but have to walk in to turn on the light to just walk back out. Lights should stay on when you want them on. Need more flexability.

    Reply
  6. Csimmons
    Csimmons says:

    I have been looking everywhere for the actual EPA data you cite. I’ve seen it referenced everywhere, but can’t find the source.

    Do you have a link to document or website?

    Thanks.

    Reply
  7. Occupancy Sensors
    Occupancy Sensors says:

    I appreciate the efforts of using occupancy sensors to reduce the wastage of extra light and electricity. Occupancy Sensors always help in maintaining the optimum usage of electricity and power.

    Reply

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. [...] rooms will help ensure lights in those rooms only come on when somebody is actually in them. Using an occupancy sensor can create light electricity savings in that room of more than [...]

  2. [...] each, will help ensure lights in those rooms only come on when somebody is actually in them. Using an occupancy sensor can create light electricity savings in that room of more than [...]

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