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thinkspace Community and EveryMove @Work

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thinkspace is teaming up with EveryMove @Work to encourage our entrepreneurial community to get moving! EveryMove is a free application you can download on your phone or computer in order to log your activity and movement throughout the day. The more activity you do, the more points you will receive! And if you receive enough points, or meet a challenge, you can win neat prizes.

thinkspace will be launching different challenges throughout the year with prizes and incentives for participants. We will be posting leaderboards throughout the halls of thinkspace so that the most active people will be spotlighted. So, whether you want to use EveryMove for motivation, to join the competition, or to track your physical progress, make sure to download the app and participate! Let’s make this holiday season an active one.

Who can join? Members of the thinkspace community and employees of thinkspace.

How to join? Create an account and join page. http://everymove.org/thinkspace. Space is limited to 25 people.

Also, come join team thinkspacers in the 30th annual 5k Jingle Bell Run/Walk! This is a great way to kick off the holiday season while raising money to fight arthritis.

The event takes place on Sunday, December 14th at the Westlake Center in Seattle. It is a 5k (about 3.1 mile) loop and you can choose to travel the course at whatever pace you like!

You can register online before December 5th and make sure to join team thinkspacers. Let’s make this a great turn out for the thinkspace community!

Here is the link to join our team. If you have any other questions feel free to contact Katie Walvatne: katie@thinkspace.com

 

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LinkedIn’s #RockYourProfile Event in Seattle Showcases How to Stand Out in the Crowd

On LinkedIn there are millions of users but not all profiles are created equally. Many are a direct reflection of their resumes, but at a recent pilot event held in Capitol Hill, LinkedIn instructed the crowd  to think of their profile as a “living, breathing” way to get a new job, customer, or even volunteer opportunity. That can be accomplished by adding rich media, from pictures to videos to links of your work.

To help those in attendance achieve those goals LinkedIn brought together a panel of experts to speak about how LinkedIn has helped them grow their brand. It included: Peter Chee, CEO and chief pot stirrer at thinkspace; Carol Vecchio, founder of Centerpoint Institute for Life and Career Renewal; and Alexis Baird, Product Manager for Profile at LinkedIn. It’s the first time the San Francisco-based company held an event like this one. They chose Seattle because of the large number of startups here and the diversity of the city.

Personality Prevails – “Talk about what you are passionate about.”

LinkedIn panel

“People do business with people, not businesses,” Peter told the crowd. “Find ways to connect on a personal level.”

That wasn’t the only time the eager group of nearly 200 entrepreneurs, small businesses, and students were encouraged to show their personality especially on a professional website. Alexis explained the importance of sharing what you are passionate about. Adding your hobbies could lead to a professional ice breaker.

When talking about how LinkedIn has worked for him, Peter described what he called his “Alex from Target moment” a few months ago. It began with posting a long form blog on his LinkedIn page late one night titled “Questions To Ask Before Quitting Your Job To Work At A Startup.” It was part of an event promotion aimed at helping those wrestling with the same decision. Several hours later the post had 3,000 views and eventually ballooned to more than 92,000 views worldwide, hundreds of comments on LinkedIn, and it helped sell out the event. Peter said the post “created value” for the event, making it a bigger success than he initially anticipated. It’s the perfect example of using personal experience to connect with your audience.

Actionable Tips

So maybe you’re not an established business owner with an expansive network and more like me. I’m in the midst of changing the course of my career and need help with the transition. Peter provided other actionable tips.

For example, after meeting someone at a networking he suggests including “why you enjoyed the conversation” in your LinkedIn message. And don’t procrastinate.

Experts suggest:

1) Tailor your profile around what you want to be doing. It’s not necessary to list every job you’ve held.

2) Avoid job titles and use statements instead.

3) Show examples of your work whenever possible e.g. pictures, links, and presentations

The LinkedIn team also offered profile makeovers. I found this one-on-one time to be invaluable. Crystal Braswell offered me tailored tips that I utilized as soon as I got home. They included changing my profile picture because she said I looked younger in person. (Yikes!) The changes instantly made my page look better. I’ve already received positive feedback which let me know I was on the right track.

Crystal Braswell gets her makep done

Whether or not you think of yourself as being photogenic the experts say don’t ignore your profile picture. The LinkedIn team converted a small area into a professional photo shoot complete with make-up artist. All night this booth had a continuous line. Your profile picture is one of the first things people see and taking the time to ensure it’s representative of who you are is important.

LinkedIn photoshoot

By the end of the event I felt rejuvenated. Receiving usable tips and being in the company of others who are working on improving their digital footprint helped recharge my career batteries. Change isn’t always easy but events like #RockYourProfile showed me that improvement isn’t an insurmountable task.

Here are more Growth hacking with LinkedIn tips from Peter Chee.

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Seattle Startup Week | Angel investor Andy Liu illustrates the importance of building rhythms

andy-presentingBy 1:00 pm on October 23, the day of his Seattle Startup Week presentation, Andy Liu, local dream investor and CEO of BuddyTV, had already been in contact with four prospective customers. According to Andy, his number one job is to sell.

“You know what? As CEO, sales is actually my number one job. Sales to customers, sales to employees, sales to investors…Sales to everybody else that may eventually come into contact with the company…I need to constantly be doing that.”

Getting in front of the customer is one of the best ways to learn about a business.

Andy also explained that businesses are built on rhythms. Therefore, it’s crucial that a company reevaluate the rhythms that are in place to be more effective on a day-to-day basis. To do this, Andy has implemented a number of rhythm-boosting practices. For example, every Monday morning he sends out an email to the entire team with BuddyTV’s latest happenings, team recognition, and any other relevant information for the upcoming week. Another tool he uses is a refined system of key performance indicators.

“It’s not 30 numbers that you need to track, it’s one or two.”

Andy wrapped up by highlighting the importance of celebrating.

“Even in the darkest days, there’s always something to celebrate…There’s always some reason to ring the bell.”

Andy follows his own advice quite literally. In BuddyTV’s office, one of the developers has a cash register linked up his computer speakers. Each time a sale comes in, the cash register dings.

What does your startup do to celebrate?

You can hear more about Andy’s rythmatic practices here:

Check out Andy’s SlideShare deck from his Seattle Startup Week presentation:

Or see the entirety of Andy’s talk here:

Check out our recaps of our other Startup Week events:

Kicking off with Aviel Ginzburg of Simply Measured
Matt Heinz explains why you have to fail in order to succeed
Russell Benaroya talks night runs and how to ease the loneliness of entrepreneurship

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Hospitality with legs.

people_walk_wallWith Halloween behind us, you know what that means…yes, the holidays are upon us. And with them come parties, entertaining, and expectations. Some expectations will be met: “The prime rib was succulent” and “This is the best pumpkin spice latte. Ever.” While other expectations will fall short: “The turkey was too dry” and “The pumpkin pie was store bought.” But despite food-driven expectations (of which mine are always high), I think what people truly long for during the holidays is hospitality. Being welcomed. Just as they are.

I recently heard an entrepreneur give a talk on hospitality. And it’s her perspective that I’ll try to remember and adopt during this holiday season. Most of us limit the definition of hospitality as being kind and generous towards those you welcome within your home. But this clever entrepreneur widened the scope of hospitality to include not just being hospitable to those that come to you, but also exiting the comfort zone of your home and going to others.

Think about it. Isn’t the person who brings a home cooked meal to someone just as hospitable as the person that prepares a meal at home and has people over to enjoy it?

Or that candy bowl on your desk, that is most welcoming indeed. But how much more welcoming is it when you stand up from your desk and walk over to a coworker to ask how their weekend was?

Okay, one more example. You’re alone at home after a fight with your boyfriend. Your friend calls to see how you are and invites you over to their house (hospitable). But then that friend decides to come over to your house to make sure you’re really, truly okay (also hospitable).

Some of the most hospitable acts are when we check our agenda and comfort zone at the door and meet people where they are at. On their terms.

So this holiday season, adopt some hospitality. And give your hospitality some legs. Let it travel around a bit.